Tweets of the Week

I am about to jump on a plane to Kuala Lumpur for IGCSE Global Perspectives workshop, so only a quick post this week.

Anzac Day dominated much of the week for Aussies, and I came across a photo from @gcnelson which reminded me I’d been at the Australian War Memorial for Anzac Day in 2013 (another PD opportunity/junket!) It is an incredible place.

Greg is also worth a follow for some fabulous pictures around Canberra.

Still on WWI (there might be a bit of WWI this year!):

Not a tweet, but I also found an excellent bibliography of the Vietnam War:

http://www.clemson.edu/caah/history/facultypages/edmoise/arvn.html - a few dead links, a few you need JSTOR access, but lots of good ones.

One that ‘TOK Teacher’ found (disclaimer: my Theory of Knowledge twitter account!) that quotes a study which claims handwritten note taking is more effective than laptops – we tend to analyse & paraphrase as we write by hand but many are quick enough typists to pretty much type every word without taking in the information.


A cheeky cartoon to finish – the importance of knowing the context of a place or event in understanding cartoons, not to mention the irreverence of cartoonists

Taking notes from long articles

(How to be a nerd and still leave yourself enough time for more important stuff)

What is your purpose for reading this? It is probably an essay title – but also: is this for background, it is on the ‘required reading’ list, you are looking for a different viewpoint, or you are looking for just a couple of supporting points / examples / quotes to back up what you already have?

  • write it at the top of your page
  • now write the FULL bibliographic details for this source
  • Note the heading.
  • Note sub-headings.
  • Read Intro.
  • Read Conclusion.

(Any ideas on your topic yet? Can you work out a basic premise of the whole article? Is it worth still reading?)

  • Skim each section.
  • Read the first paragraph or so.
  • Skim the rest of the section, but paying special attention to topic sentences.
  • In the headings or the topic sentences does it suggest any quotable phrases?

(Can you get enough for what you need from this? Try to write a sentence or two which summarises each section)

  • Does it give a list?
  • What examples does it suggest?
  • Does it quote others? (Are they worth YOU quoting?)

You have probably got the gist of the article and enough to use in your essay without having actually read every word.

BUT

  • is it interesting enough that you want to read every word? Go ahead!
  • is it important enough that you need to read every word? Get on with it!