Tweets of the Week

A busy week for me with two essays due but now done and dusted. Interestingly, one was on whether the frontier conflicts in Australia could be described as ‘war’ (and whether it makes a difference). A couple of hours after submitting it, my wife points out a new book on the subject:

If you will excuse my high horse for a few seconds, part of my essay research led me back to the latest Australian Curriculum: History scope and sequence. No where in the Year 7-10 curriculum does it explicitly include ‘Aboriginal’. This is AUSTRALIAN History!!! If you will excuse me quoting myself (and hopefully it doesn’t ruin my Turnitin score!):

‘There will always be an ‘us and them’ in Australian society
for as long as we teach ‘us and them’ Australian History.’

The best of various WWI tweets this week was from The Atlantic: 45 photos, lots I’d not seen before, including ‘dazzle camouflage’ which I’d never even heard of.

 

 

Simon pretty much sums this one up:

 

And two options as to why I was completing essays this weekend:

 

Have a great week!

BT

Tweets of the Week

I am about to jump on a plane to Kuala Lumpur for IGCSE Global Perspectives workshop, so only a quick post this week.

Anzac Day dominated much of the week for Aussies, and I came across a photo from @gcnelson which reminded me I’d been at the Australian War Memorial for Anzac Day in 2013 (another PD opportunity/junket!) It is an incredible place.

Greg is also worth a follow for some fabulous pictures around Canberra.

Still on WWI (there might be a bit of WWI this year!):

Not a tweet, but I also found an excellent bibliography of the Vietnam War:

http://www.clemson.edu/caah/history/facultypages/edmoise/arvn.html - a few dead links, a few you need JSTOR access, but lots of good ones.

One that ‘TOK Teacher’ found (disclaimer: my Theory of Knowledge twitter account!) that quotes a study which claims handwritten note taking is more effective than laptops – we tend to analyse & paraphrase as we write by hand but many are quick enough typists to pretty much type every word without taking in the information.


A cheeky cartoon to finish – the importance of knowing the context of a place or event in understanding cartoons, not to mention the irreverence of cartoonists

‘The greatest Australian you [Year 9] have never heard of’

I had a great lesson today as part of our unit on Australian identity. After looking at Aussie stereotypes I wanted them to go home and find 3-5 amazing Australians they had never heard of. I was impressed with the range of people they came up with and the depth of detail they had written down, so I found a fillable knockout tournament sheet and we proceeded to judge who we thought was the greatest Australian from our list.

Initially in groups of four, two presented their great Australian while the other two decided who they thought was the greater. Any ties was initially sorted by ‘surrender’ (your person deserves to win) or else decided by the classroom’s Final Arbiter (who did not need to be consulted).

The winners of each group found their next opponent and took with them their vanquished first round opponent. This continued through to the semi-final stage, when the last four presented in front of the whole class.

The final was between William Lawrence Bragg (x-ray analysis of crystals, DNA) and Fred Hollows (eye care/surgery, especially in indigenous communities). Representing Bragg was a tall, eloquent, Australian member of the school debating team versus a shy and quiet Indonesian girl who was so excited that ‘she’ won. This was an unexpected bonus out of the activity!

Below are the top 16 (there were a few preliminary knockouts to get it down to sixteen).

Year 9 Australian History

‘The Greatest Australian You’ve Never Heard Of’ – Year 9 History

(How typical is Hollows as a ‘great Aussie’? He was actually born in NZ…)