Tweets of the (last two) weeks

Wow. Well, half yearly exam marking has finished, which can only mean one thing: report writing. Fortunately, my PLN continues to tweet all sorts of awesomeness, so I am taking a bit of time (as an excuse to watch the football) to update my favourite tweets from the last couple of weeks. First up, more ideas of web-based PD:

Speaking of web-based PD, put ‘free’, ‘Harvard’, ‘innovation’ and ‘leadership’ in a single sentence and it’s sounding pretty good. Sure, it’s a teaser to buy their book, but there’s some reasonable content even within this Introduction

A couple of good ideas for History YouTube channels here – I’ve used Crash Course a couple of times and they usually distill the main points pretty succinctly (although I keep pausing and explaining, so a 10 minute clip takes most of a lesson…)


Despite it being pretty fundamental to any pre-service training, a number of teachers seem to not get the difference between formative and summative assessment. I’m putting this one up because it has some good ideas for some formative activities with technology

It is hardly a secret to treat people fairly, with respect and have a good time. But ‘business principles’ of trusting no one, instituting a culture of fear (or ‘accountability’ – see next one) and adhering only to minimum required by law have infected professional sport and education. Well, unfortunately Saracens lost last night, but you can be sure they’ll be back next year ready to go   

I opened this, half read it, got distracted, and now can’t find the tweet for it but never mind, I’ll tweet it myself. A US Maths teacher unloads at a TEDx about the bucks being made by proclaiming the failing education system – and, look! We’ve got a new textbook / technology / speaker to sell you…

Dedicated Improvement and Reflection Time (DIRT) – probably what we have all done at some stage, but cool acronym!

OK, enough! Have a great week.
BT

Follow me: @dphistorycom (History & Education); @tokbits (Theory of Knowledge)

 

 

Tweets of the Week

One of the iconic moments of history that is rarely mentioned in school occurred 60 years ago: Bannister’s breaking of the 4 minute mile (YouTube). It was (still is!) a remarkable feat, given a lot of his training was done in his lunch times and he was a doctor, even working on the famous morning of 6 May 1954. It’s a long way from today’s elite athletes. Thanks to Matthew Ward for the following:

 

Lots of photos light up the twittersphere, for some reason this one caught my eye:

 

It’s great to see appreciation for others’ work expressed on Twitter – because they make great leads for new people to follow and blogs to read.

 

Nothing too revolutionary in this one, but always good to have a reminder. One of these days, I’m going to put these ideas onto laminated cards and get students to pick which one they are going to do – and this could be as individuals, pairs or the whole class does the same one:

An Extended Essay workshop for me this weekend, school based PD day on Monday and Vesak Day Tuesday, so kind of a shorter work week for me coming up. I hope you have a great week.
BT

Tweets of the Week

A busy week for me with two essays due but now done and dusted. Interestingly, one was on whether the frontier conflicts in Australia could be described as ‘war’ (and whether it makes a difference). A couple of hours after submitting it, my wife points out a new book on the subject:

If you will excuse my high horse for a few seconds, part of my essay research led me back to the latest Australian Curriculum: History scope and sequence. No where in the Year 7-10 curriculum does it explicitly include ‘Aboriginal’. This is AUSTRALIAN History!!! If you will excuse me quoting myself (and hopefully it doesn’t ruin my Turnitin score!):

‘There will always be an ‘us and them’ in Australian society
for as long as we teach ‘us and them’ Australian History.’

The best of various WWI tweets this week was from The Atlantic: 45 photos, lots I’d not seen before, including ‘dazzle camouflage’ which I’d never even heard of.

 

 

Simon pretty much sums this one up:

 

And two options as to why I was completing essays this weekend:

 

Have a great week!

BT

Tweets of the Week

I am about to jump on a plane to Kuala Lumpur for IGCSE Global Perspectives workshop, so only a quick post this week.

Anzac Day dominated much of the week for Aussies, and I came across a photo from @gcnelson which reminded me I’d been at the Australian War Memorial for Anzac Day in 2013 (another PD opportunity/junket!) It is an incredible place.

Greg is also worth a follow for some fabulous pictures around Canberra.

Still on WWI (there might be a bit of WWI this year!):

Not a tweet, but I also found an excellent bibliography of the Vietnam War:

http://www.clemson.edu/caah/history/facultypages/edmoise/arvn.html - a few dead links, a few you need JSTOR access, but lots of good ones.

One that ‘TOK Teacher’ found (disclaimer: my Theory of Knowledge twitter account!) that quotes a study which claims handwritten note taking is more effective than laptops – we tend to analyse & paraphrase as we write by hand but many are quick enough typists to pretty much type every word without taking in the information.


A cheeky cartoon to finish – the importance of knowing the context of a place or event in understanding cartoons, not to mention the irreverence of cartoonists

Tweets of the Week

This is my first attempt at putting together a post on the tweets that had my attention for at least long enough to ‘favourite’. The plan is that by doing this, I will go back and read them, and by posting here, can tag and find them later.

The tweet of the week was the video ‘trailer‘ of the recently released illustrated book of  ’I was only 19‘ by John Schumann:

Coincidentally, I saw it the day after my sister gave me a copy of ‘Poems That Make Grown Men Cry‘. As a song, it is ineligible for the poetry anthology but it’s always guaranteed to make me tear up – especially, ‘Frankie kicked a mine the day that mankind kicked the moon [July 21]; God help me, he was going home in June.’ (ie he should’ve gone home three weeks ago)

A very good find for those studying World War I was

Podcasts (with transcripts) from the Imperial War Museum’s sound collection ‘to bring you the voices of those who lived through the First World War.’ Covers all sorts of aspects of the war:  the assassination, home front, Christmas Truce, Gallipoli, German Spring Offensive … Brilliant.

I got the spark to spend late Sunday night putting this together thanks to @teachertoolkit who tweeted the day following my initial ‘I should do a Tweets of the Week’ idea.

And, finally, one I found myself whilst trawling YouTube:

Well, I got it started. Now I know that I’m doing this, I’ll know to keep an eye out for more great education and history tweets.

Follow me @dphistorycom for History & Education tweets and my newly started account @tokbits for Theory of Knowledge.

Have a great week!

BT